Products

SoundCite

SoundCite makes inline audio easy and seamless

Northwestern University Knight Lab's new audio publishing tool makes inline, in-context, audio play easy and seamless. Audio is powerful device that can add emotion or context to a story. Unfortunately audio clips force uncomfortable choices: either read or listen, but not both. Until now.
What it does

Audio is a powerful device that can add emotion or context to a story. Unfortunately audio clips force uncomfortable choices: read or listen, but not both. Until now. SoundCite is a simple-to-use tool that lets you add inline audio to your story.

In a nutshell, SoundCite makes it incredibly easy for web publishers and writers to include in-line audio in their stories.

We released an alpha version in Spring 2013 and WBEZ’s Jim DeRogatis used it to give a profile of Chance the Rapper more depth by allowing readers to hear the lyrics DeRogatis cited in his piece.

Indeed, music reviews were the original inspiration for SoundCite, but we can imagine it as an effective way to  give readers quick access to clips of 911 calls, speeches, or even ambient sound. The only requirement is that the audio be hosted on SoundCloud. Unfortunately, because of SoundCloud’s embed technology, it doesn’t yet work on iPhones and other iOS-enabled devices. But don’t fret! Your text will still appear and the reader will not even be aware of the missing clip.

SoundCite is open-source and available on GitHub. We encourage you to contribute in any way you wish — fork it, send us pull requests or just let us know what you think. Of course, there’s nothing wrong with just using the tool, either.

And if you find it useful, send a thank-you to SoundCite’s creators: Knight Lab student fellow and Medill student Tyler Fisher and Medill assistant professor Jeremy Gilbert.

Check out the video above for a quick tutorial on how SoundCite works and be sure to send us any feedback: knightlab@northwestern.edu.



Connect
SoundCite

GitHub


Tyler Fisher, Knight Lab student fellow

Jeremy Gilbert, Medill assistant professor